Human-Centered Computing Section – University of Copenhagen

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Department of Computer Science DIKU > Research > Human-Centered Computi...

The Human-Centred Computing (HCC) section at DIKU is concerned with the theory and practice of how people engage with computing. Currently our focus is on the following topics:

HUMAN-COMPUTER INTERACTION (HCI)

Human-computer interaction relates to the design, implementation, and evaluation of interactive technology. Our research focuses on new sensing and tracking technologies, information visualization, shape change, and mobile user interfaces. New and innovative designs are empirically studied in collaboration with potential users. In our research we strive to build on an understanding of human needs and capabilities.

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MOBILE USER INTERFACES

Our research is concerned with aspects of the mobility of users. On the one hand, this contains novel interaction techniques that are particularly designed for use 'on the go', where, for example, only one hand can be used while the other is occupied carrying a bag. On the other hand, we focus on "walk-up-and-use" scenarios, in which only technology already present in the environment can be used.

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COMPUTER-SUPPORTED COOPERATIVE WORK (CSCW)

We focus on understanding cooperative work practices and designing technologies to improve coordination, mediate communication, and facilitate collaboration in complex work environments.

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SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT

Systems development is concerned with creating and evolving IT systems. We are focussing on approaches to system development with active stakeholder involvement in analysis, design, construction, evaluation and evolution.

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HEALTH INFORMATICS

Health informatics concerns the use of information and the research, development and evaluation of it-systems in healthcare. Our aim in health informatics is to research, design and prototype information systems that improve the quality and efficiency of collaboration and communication in healthcare. Our research approach is primarily exploratory, experimental and interventionist.

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